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Are You Getting Enough Vitamin D?

April 23, 2019 - 6:56am
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During the past few decades we have been taught to be wary of the sun. For some reason, research that found sunburns to be linked to skin cancer morphed into warnings about any sun exposure. We are continually being told not to go out into the sun without SPF 99 sunblock and a UV ray-blocking shirt. The downside to this sun aversion, however, might be the reason for an estimated 40% of Americans who are vitamin D deficient. Also, worldwide, vitamin D deficiency exists is about 50% of the population. Wearing a sunscreen with a sun protection factor of 30 reduces vitamin D synthesis in the skin by more than 95%.

D and K for Healthy Bones

April 17, 2019 - 6:40am
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We know a lot about vitamin D and bone health. Vitamin D is considered a “secosteroid hormone” essential for calcium absorption and bone mineralization, and is positively associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Without it, we cannot effectively absorb calcium, which we need to help maintain healthy teeth and bones. Also, in a recent study in Annals of Saudi Medicine, vitamin D levels were shown to directly impact BMD. Data was collected on 400 participants where 25OHD levels were taken as well as BMD measurements. What they found came as no surprise; adequate levels of vitamin D had a positive correlation on bone mass among all age groups. 

But what do we know about vitamin K? In addition to vitamin D, vitamin K is another bone-building vitamin. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin first identified in a study on blood coagulation by Carl Peter Henrik in Denmark. The letter “K” stands for “Koagulation’, a Danish term for coagulation. Vitamin K falls into two types: vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1 is also known as phylloquinone or phytonadione, and vitamin K2, menaquinone. Different types of vitamin K vary in their biological activities. Vitamin K1 is mainly stored in the liver and plays a greater role in production of coagulation proteins, while vitamin K2 is distributed throughout the whole body. Most of our leafy greens are high in vitamin K and include kale, mustard greens, swiss chard, and spinach.

D and K for Healthy Bones

April 17, 2019 - 6:40am
iStock-479572586

We know a lot about vitamin D and bone health. Vitamin D is considered a “secosteroid hormone” essential for calcium absorption and bone mineralization, and is positively associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Without it, we cannot effectively absorb calcium, which we need to help maintain healthy teeth and bones. Also, in a recent study in Annals of Saudi Medicine, vitamin D levels were shown to directly impact BMD. Data was collected on 400 participants where 25OHD levels were taken as well as BMD measurements. What they found came as no surprise; adequate levels of vitamin D had a positive correlation on bone mass among all age groups. 

But what do we know about vitamin K? In addition to vitamin D, vitamin K is another bone-building vitamin. Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin first identified in a study on blood coagulation by Carl Peter Henrik in Denmark. The letter “K” stands for “Koagulation’, a Danish term for coagulation. Vitamin K falls into two types: vitamin K1 and vitamin K2. Vitamin K1 is also known as phylloquinone or phytonadione, and vitamin K2, menaquinone. Different types of vitamin K vary in their biological activities. Vitamin K1 is mainly stored in the liver and plays a greater role in production of coagulation proteins, while vitamin K2 is distributed throughout the whole body. Most of our leafy greens are high in vitamin K and include kale, mustard greens, swiss chard, and spinach.

Abbreviated Topography of Major Landmarks in Our Knowledge of Vitamin D3, Cholecalciferol

April 9, 2019 - 7:35am
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The human nutrient vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is essential for life and—as is common with nutrients—plays important roles in many aspects of physiology, including the functioning of numerous cells and tissues in various organs and systems, including the immune system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system including the gut microbiome, the latter of which can be considered an extracorporeal metabolic organ with body-wide connections and impact.

Abbreviated Topography of Major Landmarks in Our Knowledge of Vitamin D3, Cholecalciferol

April 9, 2019 - 7:35am
iStock-480322356

The human nutrient vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is essential for life and—as is common with nutrients—plays important roles in many aspects of physiology, including the functioning of numerous cells and tissues in various organs and systems, including the immune system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system including the gut microbiome, the latter of which can be considered an extracorporeal metabolic organ with body-wide connections and impact.

Vitamin D’s Critical Role in Weight Management

April 2, 2019 - 9:04am
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When undergoing a weight management program, one of the first steps might be to check vitamin D levels. Oftentimes, people who need to lose weight simultaneously experience low energy, which may actually be a symptom of blood sugar dysregulation. And, according to some researchers, vitamin D may provide support for helping regulate blood sugars.